All Posts Tagged With: "mothers"

The Pirate’s Daughter, Margaret Cezair-Thompson

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“Back in America, little was known of my life in Jamaica,” wrote Errol Flynn

I had the privilege of meeting and cruising with the Manic Mommies back in November. One of the lovely mommies, Kim Erskine, organized an on-ship book club and we all met up in the library one afternoon to chat about The Pirate’s Daughter. It was the perfect backdrop to talk about a book set in the tropics. The conversation was thought-provoking and as with most book clubs, impressions were introduced that weren’t previously considered. Some of the questions our group had about the book went unanswered, so it was wonderful to pose them directly to the woman who penned the words. I contacted The Pirate’s Daughter author, Margaret Cezair-Thompson and asked her to speak with me about her book.

Listen in as Margaret speaks so eloquently about her book and the Caribbean island nation she adores so much. She is a gifted storyteller and simply a delightful person.

PirateThen, join the conversation & be entered to win a FREE copy of The Pirate’s Daughter by:

  • Leaving a comment below and/or

  • Calling 206-309-7318 and sharing your impressions of the book or this interview–something I can play on-air

  • Deadline February 15th, 2009, EST

  • No P.O. Boxes Please

  • U.S. & Canada residents only

Unbridled Books Description:

In 1946, a storm-wrecked boat carrying Hollywood’s most famous swashbuckler shored up on the coast of Jamaica, and the glamorous world of 1940’s Hollywood converged with that of a small West Indian society. After a long and storied career on the silver screen, Errol Flynn spent much of the last years of his life on a small island off of Jamaica, throwing parties and sleeping with increasingly younger teenaged girls. Based on those years, The Pirate’s Daughter is the story of Ida, a local girl who has an affair with Flynn that produces a daughter, May, who meets her father but once. Margaret

Spanning two generations of women whose destinies become inextricably linked with the matinee idol’s, this lively novel tells the provocative history of a vanished era, of uncommon kinships, compelling attachments, betrayal and atonement in a paradisal, tropical setting. As adept with Jamaican vernacular as she is at revealing the internal machinations of a fading and bloated matinee idol, Margaret Cezair-Thompson weaves a saga of a mother and daughter finding their way in a nation struggling to rise to the challenge of independence. 

A wonderful book review excerpt from BookingMama:
THE PIRATE’S DAUGHTER by Margaret Cezair-Thompson has been on my radar for over a year now so I was very excited when one of my book club members selected it for our December meeting. News about this book just kept popping up everywhere, and all of the buzz was so good. I think it was only a matter of time before I picked it up.

I first heard about this novel when Unbridled Books released it last fall. The book’s description sounded very interesting to me. Then, it started receiving some big-time praise including including the #1 October 2007 Book Sense Pick as well as 2008 Essence Magazine Literary Award for Fiction. In August, the trade paperback version of THE PIRATE’S DAUGHTER was released by Random House with a bright, gorgeous cover. And just a few months ago, Celestial Seasonings’ Adventure at Every Turn selected it as one of their book club picks. I am just so glad that someone finally selected it for us to discuss.

I wasn’t sure what I was expecting when I began reading THE PIRATE’S DAUGHTER, but I have to say that the book was a little different than I thought it would be. While I knew that the story was about a young Jamaican girl, Ida, who falls in love with Errol Flynn, I didn’t know that the book also included a lot of historical information about Jamaica. Having known absolutely nothing about Jamaica and their struggle for independence in the 1970s, I thought it was very interesting. The author did a tremendous job of incorporating the history with the characters in this novel.

I had always known that Errol Flynn was a unique figure to say the least, but I had no idea how much trouble this man could cause. I found him to be extremely distasteful — he seemed to prefer under-age girls and lots of alcohol; however, I thoroughly enjoyed the descriptions of him and his actions — these scenes were excellent. He must have been such a charismatic figure because men and women alike wanted to be in his presence (although to me he just seemed disgusting.) I found it so sad that Ida fell in love with him (or the idea of him) and ended up sacrificing her entire life because of her feelings. For More . . . 

Margaret’s Suggested Reading:

  • Mister Pipp, by Lloyd Jones “I love and highly recommend,” says Margaret

Margaret’s favorite author (when forced to pick ONLY one!):

Links:

The Fiction Class, Susan J. Breen

To enter to win a free copy of The Fiction Class:

  • Be sure to subscribe to the Words To Mouth e-newsletter ~ That’s how I announce winners!
  • Help me get the word out! Tell at least three friends about Words To Mouth and ask them to comment below this interview citing your first name

FictionclassA Conversation with Susan J. Breen

Carrie:  What inspired you to write The Fiction Class?
Susan:
  I was at a funeral of someone I didn’t really know. I was sitting with some friends and we began to talk and everyone, absolutely everyone, was telling a story about her mother. And when I left, it hit me for the first time just how powerful mother/daughter stories are—how funny and infuriating. I wanted to write about it.

Carrie: Tell us just a bit about The Fiction Class.
Susan:
  Arabella teaches a class in creative writing in Manhattan, but she’s having some difficulties with her students. Things aren’t going well with her mother, either, but when she begins to teach her mother how to write, Arabella’s surprised when their relationship takes an unexpected turn.

Carrie:   What is the primary message you’d like your readers to take away from The Fiction Class?
Susan:
Writing fiction can be healing (And, just because you’re mad at your mother now, doesn’t mean you have to be mad at her your whole life; and vice versa).

Carrie:   Which character do you identify with the most and how much of yourself shows up in The Fiction Class?
Susan:
There’s a lot of me in Arabella, who is the protagonist of the book. Part of why I wrote this novel was to understand my relationship with my mother, so in some ways I was doing a form of psychoanalysis on myself in creating Arabella’s character. The way she sees the world and reacts to things are very much my own. However, Arabella’s also quite different from me—younger, taller, single. So I see her more as a young friend who’s going through situations similar to ones I went through.

Carrie:   What are you reading right now?
Susan:
  The Knitting Circle by Ann Hood. It’s wonderful.  Also, Bleak House by Charles Dickens.

It’s Not Your Mother’s Bridge Club, Michele Cozzens

Bridgeclubcover5 (1)

To Enter to Win a FREE Copy of It’s Not Your Mother’s Bridge Club:

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  • As always, I’d love hearing from you at 206–309–7318
  • Carrie’s Conversation with Michele:

    What inspired you to write It’s Not Your Mother’s Bridge Club?
    It’s Not Your Mother’s Bridge Club is the story of a group of women who gather monthly to play the dice game, “bunko.” I’ve been part of bunko group for the past eight years. This means eight years of first-Thursday-of-the-month, girls’-night-out experiences, and each time I get together with these women they make me laugh, they make me cry, and they make me know I’ve got friends on whom I can rely when I truly need them. Since millions of American women belong to bunko groups, I believed they’d be able to relate to the women of the Snake Eyes Dice Club. And so I created a group of fictional characters. I’ve tried to make them as funny and interesting as my real life friends . . . but this was a tall order.COZENS

    Give us an idea of the plot without giving too much away.
    This is primarily a character study. Most bunko groups have 12 players who play a simple dice game that takes very little thought and no strategy. I reduced the number to eight. Believe me it was enough having eight fictional women living in my head as I wrote their story. The characters are middle-aged and middle-to upper-middle class, and they live in a desert community, the Rattlesnake Valley. What they have in common is their

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    • About WordstoMouth

      Carrie created Words-to-Mouth—a blog & companion Internet talk show introducing new book releases and their authors to a community interested in excellent writing that may not  necessarily top the New York Times Bestseller List—Yet! To learn more about Carrie, click here